Andrew's Random Tumblings

Questions?   The tumblr blog of science fiction comic creator Andrew Crisp.

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    Inktober Day 18.  A colored image of Cpt. Teri Holland for today.
Bit of a “plan B” image, as the group picture I hoped to do today just wasn’t coming together.  So I put this together instead.

    Inktober Day 18.  A colored image of Cpt. Teri Holland for today.

    Bit of a “plan B” image, as the group picture I hoped to do today just wasn’t coming together.  So I put this together instead.

    — 1 day ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #my characters  #Teri Holland 
    Squeaking in just under the wire with Inktober Day 17, and the last of my three space habitat images.
Ah, the Stanford Torus.  I remember this showing up in some of the kids science magazines of my youth (Owl magazine, around 1984-1985 if I remember correctly), and it remains THE design for space colonies to me.  The O’Neill cylinder is a good design too, but this one just hits close to the heart.  Sigh.
Anyway, the Stanford Torus was another design from O’Neill’s group, and it actually predated the Island One design, although it was more spacious, with an upper population limit of roughly 140,000 people. 
Pushed this one a little more on perspective (esp. drawing ellipses in perspective) and tried to squeeze in more detail. I’m drawing most of these Inktober images on pieces of card stock cut to roughly postcard size (4.25” x 5.5”).  The smaller sizes make it easier for me as a small blank page is less daunting than a big blank page, but man is it a pain to get details in.

    Squeaking in just under the wire with Inktober Day 17, and the last of my three space habitat images.

    Ah, the Stanford Torus.  I remember this showing up in some of the kids science magazines of my youth (Owl magazine, around 1984-1985 if I remember correctly), and it remains THE design for space colonies to me.  The O’Neill cylinder is a good design too, but this one just hits close to the heart.  Sigh.

    Anyway, the Stanford Torus was another design from O’Neill’s group, and it actually predated the Island One design, although it was more spacious, with an upper population limit of roughly 140,000 people. 

    Pushed this one a little more on perspective (esp. drawing ellipses in perspective) and tried to squeeze in more detail. I’m drawing most of these Inktober images on pieces of card stock cut to roughly postcard size (4.25” x 5.5”).  The smaller sizes make it easier for me as a small blank page is less daunting than a big blank page, but man is it a pain to get details in.

    — 2 days ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #space colonies  #stanford torus 
    Day 16 of Inktober - passed the halfway mark and I’m still at it!  
Another space habitat for you - the Island One habitat, AKA the Bernal Sphere.  The original Bernal Sphere was thought up by Prof. J.D. Bernal back in 1929 as a 16 km hollow sphere filled with air, but got a much-needed redesign in the 1970s by Gerald K. O’Neill and his Stanford team.  Island One was to have a sphere 500 meters in diameter, rotated for gravity, with torus-shaped farms on either end, and a huge mirror to reflect sunlight through windows in the sphere.  Large radiators were also added to get rid of the excess heat the habitat and its residents would generate.
I used this as a chance to play with perspective a bit more, and to try and freedraw ellipses - bit of a partial success, there.  One more habitat and we’ll be done the space colony drawings.

    Day 16 of Inktober - passed the halfway mark and I’m still at it!  

    Another space habitat for you - the Island One habitat, AKA the Bernal Sphere.  The original Bernal Sphere was thought up by Prof. J.D. Bernal back in 1929 as a 16 km hollow sphere filled with air, but got a much-needed redesign in the 1970s by Gerald K. O’Neill and his Stanford team.  Island One was to have a sphere 500 meters in diameter, rotated for gravity, with torus-shaped farms on either end, and a huge mirror to reflect sunlight through windows in the sphere.  Large radiators were also added to get rid of the excess heat the habitat and its residents would generate.

    I used this as a chance to play with perspective a bit more, and to try and freedraw ellipses - bit of a partial success, there.  One more habitat and we’ll be done the space colony drawings.

    — 3 days ago with 2 notes
    #inktober  #space colonies 
    A quick sketch of an O’Neill cylinder, a space colony concept from the 1970s, for Inktober Day 15.  
Not long after the US had its successes with the Apollo program, people started to dream big when it came to colonizing space.  Dr. Gerald K. O’Neill imagined of building these cylinders as future homes in space - the smallest ones would be a kilometer long and house up to 10,000 people.  Sadly, the gulf between dream and reality was huge, as by the time O’Neill had started to pitch his concepts seriously to the government of the day, nobody had any real experience with building large structures in space.  We hadn’t even begun to mine the Moon, which would have to be a key source of raw materials for these colonies.
So much needed to be done, so many scientific and engineering questions needed to be answered, and so many resources needed to be committed to a project with no real reward for the leaders of the day, that the project died in the womb.  
It’s been nearly 40 years since O’Neill’s vision and we’re no closer to achieving it.  But given recent progress with more nations and even private companies reaching space, I expect to see the infrastructure needed to build such colonies being established before my death.
(In other news I think my black Copic marker is finally starting to give out - I bought that marker four years ago.  I should look into getting refills.)

    A quick sketch of an O’Neill cylinder, a space colony concept from the 1970s, for Inktober Day 15.  

    Not long after the US had its successes with the Apollo program, people started to dream big when it came to colonizing space.  Dr. Gerald K. O’Neill imagined of building these cylinders as future homes in space - the smallest ones would be a kilometer long and house up to 10,000 people.  Sadly, the gulf between dream and reality was huge, as by the time O’Neill had started to pitch his concepts seriously to the government of the day, nobody had any real experience with building large structures in space.  We hadn’t even begun to mine the Moon, which would have to be a key source of raw materials for these colonies.

    So much needed to be done, so many scientific and engineering questions needed to be answered, and so many resources needed to be committed to a project with no real reward for the leaders of the day, that the project died in the womb.  

    It’s been nearly 40 years since O’Neill’s vision and we’re no closer to achieving it.  But given recent progress with more nations and even private companies reaching space, I expect to see the infrastructure needed to build such colonies being established before my death.

    (In other news I think my black Copic marker is finally starting to give out - I bought that marker four years ago.  I should look into getting refills.)

    — 4 days ago with 2 notes
    #inktober  #space colonies 
    Another day, another Inktober entry.
Villains!  What’s a story without villains?  In Teri’s world, the big villains are a group called FORTRESS, sort of what you get when you mix HYDRA from the Marvel movies with Cerberus from Mass Effect and the Project for a New American Century from real life.  FORTRESS’ central philosophy is that it’s a hostile universe out there, and only Earth, the birthplace of humanity and still home to over four-fifth’s of the human race, is fit to lead the defense against whatever unknowns are out there.  Concepts like “equality among the human worlds” and “peace with aliens” are tantamount to treason for them.  So far they’ve been content to work in the shadows, trying to change government policy through lobbying and covert skullduggery, but that might change, and soon…
The above is a concept for a rank-and-file FORTRESS soldier.  Rather simple and I suppose generic, but it gives me a starting point.  We may see more of these guys before the month is out.

    Another day, another Inktober entry.

    Villains!  What’s a story without villains?  In Teri’s world, the big villains are a group called FORTRESS, sort of what you get when you mix HYDRA from the Marvel movies with Cerberus from Mass Effect and the Project for a New American Century from real life.  FORTRESS’ central philosophy is that it’s a hostile universe out there, and only Earth, the birthplace of humanity and still home to over four-fifth’s of the human race, is fit to lead the defense against whatever unknowns are out there.  Concepts like “equality among the human worlds” and “peace with aliens” are tantamount to treason for them.  So far they’ve been content to work in the shadows, trying to change government policy through lobbying and covert skullduggery, but that might change, and soon…

    The above is a concept for a rank-and-file FORTRESS soldier.  Rather simple and I suppose generic, but it gives me a starting point.  We may see more of these guys before the month is out.

    — 5 days ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #my characters  #villains 
    A little action piece for Inktober Day 13!  Here we have our heroes running from some threat… but what?  Rogue security bots?  FORTRESS goons?  Rabid fans?
This took a little longer than previous sketches, but it was a fun one.  Maybe I’ll try more action pieces for following weekends.

    A little action piece for Inktober Day 13!  Here we have our heroes running from some threat… but what?  Rogue security bots?  FORTRESS goons?  Rabid fans?

    This took a little longer than previous sketches, but it was a fun one.  Maybe I’ll try more action pieces for following weekends.

    — 6 days ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #my characters 
    Inktober day 12.  Here we have the last member of Teri’s crew.  
Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving Monday up here in Canada, I have the day off.  I hope to have an extra special contribution for Inktober tomorrow.  

    Inktober day 12.  Here we have the last member of Teri’s crew.  

    Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving Monday up here in Canada, I have the day off.  I hope to have an extra special contribution for Inktober tomorrow.  

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #my characters 
    Inktober day 11: another member of Teri’s crew, and shall we guess what his job is?  One more and the senior crew is done, then it’s on to some supporting cast concepts.

    Inktober day 11: another member of Teri’s crew, and shall we guess what his job is?  One more and the senior crew is done, then it’s on to some supporting cast concepts.

    — 1 week ago with 2 notes
    #inktober  #my characters 
    Inktober day 10… a few minutes late, alas.  Had a tiring day at work, and some trouble thinking on a suitable “scene” for this character, hence my lateness.  
Anyway, yes, another character from Teri’s crew - about halfway through the roster now.  Trying to see if I can vary my faces a bit - while not as bad as some examples I can think of, sameface is a problem for me.

    Inktober day 10… a few minutes late, alas.  Had a tiring day at work, and some trouble thinking on a suitable “scene” for this character, hence my lateness.  

    Anyway, yes, another character from Teri’s crew - about halfway through the roster now.  Trying to see if I can vary my faces a bit - while not as bad as some examples I can think of, sameface is a problem for me.

    — 1 week ago with 3 notes
    #inktober  #my characters 
    Inktober day 9!  And yet another character from Teri’s crew.  I have names for all these people, but I think I’ll wait until I can attempt a group shot before assigning names to faces.  
I’m finding these quick sketches are taking me about 20-30 minutes total to complete.  The marker ones take about another twenty on top of that - mostly to let the inked lines dry before I try to erase any of the pencil underdrawing that’s still visible without smudging the lines.  If nothing else, by the end of this month I figure I will either be able to produce better quality drawings in a shorter timeframe, or have more confidence to put something down on paper without wanting to redraw it twenty times before inking.  Or both.

    Inktober day 9!  And yet another character from Teri’s crew.  I have names for all these people, but I think I’ll wait until I can attempt a group shot before assigning names to faces.  

    I’m finding these quick sketches are taking me about 20-30 minutes total to complete.  The marker ones take about another twenty on top of that - mostly to let the inked lines dry before I try to erase any of the pencil underdrawing that’s still visible without smudging the lines.  If nothing else, by the end of this month I figure I will either be able to produce better quality drawings in a shorter timeframe, or have more confidence to put something down on paper without wanting to redraw it twenty times before inking.  Or both.

    — 1 week ago with 1 note
    #inktober  #my characters